News

(Belated) Welcome to new Graduate students!

The ACELab welcomes its first cohort of graduate students: Jennifer Bertand (MSc Phys Ed & Rec), Ewen Lavoie (MSc Phys Ed and Rec) and Nathan Wispinski (Psychology, co-supervised by Dr. Anthony Singhal).  Check out their profiles in the People page for more information on how they got here, what they’re doing and where they’re going!

ACELab @ RECON 2015

The ACELab enjoyed a weekend in the mountains for the annual Phys Ed and Rec graduate student retreat, RECON.  New MSc students Jennifer Bertrand and Ewen Lavoie joined Dr. Chapman in a weekend full of learning, talking, socializing and WHITE WATER RAFTING! (special thanks to PERGSS for putting together the conference).  Congratulations to Ewen Lavoie who, in addition to saving his supervisors life (see below) also won the award for best oral presentation.

ACELab goes over the edge: Ewen Lavoie, front left; Dr. Chapman, 2nd row left; Jennifer Bertrand, second row right.

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Where’s Dr. Chapman? Can you tell whose missing from panels 4 to 5? Later, Ewen and others helped pull the man over board, back on board.

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NOW ACCEPTING Graduate student applications

Applications are invited for two graduate student positions jointly supervised in the Action in Complex Environments Laboratory of Dr. Craig Chapman and the Attention and Action Laboratory of Dr. Anthony Singhal at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. Applicants can choose to apply for graduate studies through either the department of Psychology, the Neuroscience and Mental Health Institute or the Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation.

The successful applicants will have completed an undergraduate degree and have significant interest/experience in one or more of: Psychology, Neuroscience, Kinesiology, Cognitive Science or other disciplines related to Cognitive Neuroscience. While not required, research experience in human behavioural studies, including exposure to electroencephalography (EEG), motion tracking and/or eye-tracking is preferred. Also preferred are candidates with basic computer programming skills (e.g. Matlab). 

These graduate students will be at the forefront of the development of a world class facility capable of simultaneously recording from mobile EEG, head-mounted eye-tracking and full body motion capture. This unique combination of data collection techniques will allow for unparalleled freedom to explore the complex, rich and dynamic interplay between high level cognitive / emotional states and their manifestation and effects on (and how they in turn are influenced by) lower level body and eye control.

Successful students are expected to be competitive for major graduate student awards (e.g. tri-council funding) but financial support is guaranteed through either the home faculty or via supervisor support (Drs. Chapman and Singhal are both NSERC funded). These positions are anticipated to begin September 2015 and will be open until filled.

Interested applicants should email Dr. Craig Chapman and / or Dr. Anthony Singhal.

ACELab secures NSERC funding

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In the spring of 2014, Dr Chapman was awarded a 5-year NSERC Discovery Grant to run the ACELab.  We are now actively recruiting graduate students to support with this funding.

Dr. Chapman Speaks!

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New faculty members in Physical Education and Recreation are invited to do an inaugural, TED-style lecture.  Here is the link to Dr. Chapman’s talk titled: “The Brain as an Information Processor: A motor chauvinist’s perspective”

What makes a good free throw?

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For BPE student Kurtis Smit’s PEDS 499 Directed studies project, we used motion tracking to record the free throw shooting of two University of Alberta Golden Bear varsity basketball players. To watch a video that shows one free throw shot from a video camera and the same free throw shot using our motion capture equipment, click here.  We are currently analyzing the data to see if we can find movement variables that predict shot success.